• Kimsooja
    A Laundry Field, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Deductive Objects, 1993/2020

  • Kimsooja
    Meta Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Sowing Into Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Sowing Into Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Sowing Into Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Thread Routes, 2014

  • Kimsooja
    To Breath, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    A Laundry Field, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Deductive Objects, 1993/2020

  • Kimsooja
    Meta Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Sowing Into Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Sowing Into Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Sowing Into Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Thread Routes, 2014

  • Kimsooja
    To Breath, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    A Laundry Field, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Deductive Objects, 1993/2020

  • Kimsooja
    Meta Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Sowing Into Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Thread Routes, 2014

  • Kimsooja
    To Breath, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    A Laundry Field, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Deductive Objects, 1993/2020

  • Kimsooja
    Meta Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Sowing Into Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Sowing Into Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Sowing Into Painting, 2020

  • Kimsooja
    Thread Routes, 2014

  • Kimsooja
    To Breath, 2020

Art Projects 2020

Kimsooja – Sowing Into Painting

Exhibition Period May 9–November 1, 2020
Opening May 9–10, 2020
Curators Elisabeth Millqvist & Mattias Givell

In the summer of 2020, the Wanås Foundation presents Sowing Into Painting, a solo exhibition with new works by internationally acclaimed artist Kimsooja. The artist is creating a planting project for the sculpture park Wanås Konst in the form of a flax cultivation that investigates the conceptual relationship between painting, agriculture, and textile. 

The exhibition opens without an inauguration on the weekend of May 9–10. The visitors are welcome to explore the artworks in the Sculpture Park, Art Gallery, and Hay Barn. Free admission, Sunday May 10. 

Sowing Into Painting gives space for reflection

Kimsooja uses nature and architecture and transforms them with the help of mirrors and fabric that call attention to us in our surroundings and give space for reflection. Kimsooja describes the exhibition Sowing Into Painting at Wanås Konst as creating a circle within her oeuvre connecting her long standing interests in painting, textiles and agriculture.

Just inside one of the gates to the Sculpture Park, near the buildings at Wanås, flax grows as a part of Kimsooja’s exhibition. Through her interest in cultivating at Wanås, she takes advantage of something unique to the site that most art museums cannot offer—the possibility of farming the land. The flax field, which carries the same title as the exhibition, is sown at the end of April, will grow and change over the course of the exhibition from green sprouts to stalks with sky-blue flowers and seeds. Growing flax pulls us back within art history to the flax fibers that were used to manufacture textiles including canvas and linseed oil that is the classic binding agent in artists’ oil paints.

These plants, which are grown and cultivated in a period of several months, will be transformed into paintings that could last for centuries. As well as a physical source of materials for painting, the field becomes a fluid tableau, covering the ground, in a pattern akin to a weaving in the earth, Kimsooja says. 

In the sculpture park, she has instead chosen to work with old-fashioned white sheets that in Sweden are traditionally embroidered with a monogram or decorated with lace—a frame of life that are a part of creating a home and that display care and reflection. The work is titled A Laundry Field and for Kimsooja, they are like a hanging field of paintings, in the beech wood forest, while they simultaneously provide connections to the mundane. 

In the Art Gallery, Kimsooja again works with textiles as a new series of large scale conceptual painting. In Meta-Painting, raw canvases of linen, both stretched and folded like bottari, the Korean cloth bundles used to wrap belongings and that have become a characteristic element of her oeuvre with references to migration and displacement.

In the old Hay Barn from 1750, Kimsooja has installed To Breathe, a mirror floor that reflects the surroundings and structure of the ceiling construction, which rises like a cathedral with its highest point 14 meters up. Through the mirror floor, she gives space for the observer to enter, and become a part of the artwork. On the other side of the building, which is more than 50 meters long, she has worked with stuffing fabrics in cracks and holes in the stone wall. In the large space, artworks coexist that make us look far away and up close. Her works both occupy the room and leave it empty—the entire space becomes an experience, with this experience being her artwork.

Immerse in the art at Wanås Konst – click here to download this year's program paper!

 

Kimsooja (born 1957 in Daegu, South Korea)  is an internationally acclaimed conceptual multi-media artist. Her practice combines performance, film, photo, and site-specific installation using textile, light, and sound. Kimsooja’s work reaches into conceptual and experiential domains latent in our surroundings and brings us to an awareness of self and others; she investigates questions concerning the conditions of humanity, while engaging issues of aesthetics, culture, politics, and the environment. Her principle of ‘nondoing’ and ‘non-making,’ which follows a conceptual and structural investigation of performance through modes of mobility and immobility, inverts the notion of the artist as the predominant actor. Kimsooja’s work invites us to question our existence, the world, and the major challenges we are facing in this era.